Volume 3, Issue 4 (12-2021)                   JAD 2021, 3(4): 28-39 | Back to browse issues page


XML Print


Download citation:
BibTeX | RIS | EndNote | Medlars | ProCite | Reference Manager | RefWorks
Send citation to:

Sharma B K, Sharma S. The biodiverse rotifers (Rotifera: Eurotatoria) of Majuli River Island – an alluvial floodplain of Assam state (northeast India) and the largest river island. JAD. 2021; 3 (4) :28-39
URL: http://jad.lu.ac.ir/article-1-157-en.html
1- Department of Zoology, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong - 793 022, Meghalaya, India , profbksharma@gmail.com
2- Lady Veronica Road, Shillong - 793 003, Meghalaya, India
Abstract:   (3794 Views)
Our assessment of Rotifera biodiversity of the floodplain wetlands of the Majuli River Island of the Brahmaputra basin in Assam state, northeast India (NEI) reveals a total of 175 species belonging to 39 genera and 19 families. The rich and diverse assemblages of the phylum categorize the Majuli as one of the megadiverse Rotifera region of India. The observed biodiversity of  Rotifera is hypothesized to be associated with the habitat diversity of the Majuli wetlands, including its varied aquatic macrophytes, the location of the study areas in the ‘Indo-Burmese biodiversity hotspot’ and the ‘Rotiferologist effect’, and merits conservation interest in light of the extinction threat to this alluvial floodplain. We record one rotifer species as new to the Indian sub-region and NEI, and 29 species as new records from the Majuli. We also consider various newly recorded species to be of global and regional biogeography interest, with some hypothesized to have a biogeographic role linked to the ‘Assam gateway’. High richness of Lecane > LepadellaTrichocerca, the richness of Testudinella, and the paucity of Brachionus species are noteworthy features. Reports of 175 species from floodplain lakes and 148 species from small wetlands indicate biodiverse rotifer assemblages in these two categories of wetlands and present a useful contribution to Rotifera ecological diversity of the Indian and the tropical floodplains.
Full-Text [PDF 2631 kb]   (730 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Original Research Article | Subject: Species Diversity
Received: 2021/06/5 | Accepted: 2021/10/12 | Published: 2021/12/31

References
1. Anderson, H. H. (1889). Notes on Indian Rotifera. Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 58: 345-358.
2. Arora, J. and Mehra, N. K. (2003). Species diversity of planktonic and epiphytic rotifers in the backwaters of the Delhi segment of the Yamuna River, with remarks on new records from India. Zoological Studies, 42 (2): 239-247.
3. Baumgartner, G., Nakataki, K. M., Cavicchiolo, M. and Baugartner, M. S. (1997). Some aspects of the ecology of fish larvae in the floodplain of the high Parana river, Brazil. Review Brazilian Zoology, 14: 551-563. [DOI:10.1590/S0101-81751997000300005]
4. Bonecker, C. C., Costa, C. L. D., Velho, L. F. M. and Lansac-Tôha, F. A. (2005). Diversity and abundance of the planktonic rotifers in different environments of the Upper Paraná River floodplain (Paraná State - Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil). Hydrobiologia, 546: 405-414. [DOI:10.1007/s10750-005-4283-2]
5. Brito, M. T. S., Heino, J., Pozoobom, U. M. and Landerio, V. L. (2020). Ecological uniqueness and species richness of zooplankton in subtropical floodplain lakes. Aquatic Sciences, 82 (2): 43. [DOI:10.1007/s00027-020-0715-3]
6. Céréghino, R., Boix, D., Cauchie, H. M., Martens, K. and Oertli, B. (2014). The ecological role of ponds in a changing world. Hydrobiologia, 723 (1): 1-6. [DOI:10.1007/s10750-013-1719-y]
7. Dhanapathi, M. V. S. S. S. (1976). A new lecanid rotifer from India. Hydrobiologia, 50: 191-192. [DOI:10.1007/BF00019823]
8. De Ridder, M. (1981). Some considerations on the geographical distribution of Rotifera. Hydrobiologia, 85: 209-235. [DOI:10.1007/BF00017611]
9. Dussart, B. H., Fernando, C. H., Matsumura-Tundisi, J. and Shiel, R. J. (1984). A review of systematics, distribution and ecology of tropical freshwater zooplankton. Hydrobiologia, 113: 77-91. [DOI:10.1007/BF00026594]
10. Fernando, C. H. (1980). The freshwater zooplankton of Sri Lanka, with a discussion of tropical freshwater zooplankton composition. Internationale Revue Hydrobiologie, 65: 411-426. [DOI:10.1002/iroh.19800650310]
11. Fontaneto, D., Márcia Barbosa, A., Segers, H. and Pautasso, M. (2012): The 'rotiferologist' effect and the other global correlates of species richness in rotifers. Ecography, 35: 174-182. [DOI:10.1111/j.1600-0587.2011.06850.x]
12. Green, J. (2003). Associations of planktonic and periphytic rotifers in a tropical swamp, the Okavango Delta, Southern Africa. Hydrobiologia, 490: 197-209.
13. Oertli, B. (2018). Freshwater biodiversity conservation: The role of artificial ponds in the 21st century. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 28 (2): 264-269. [DOI:10.1002/aqc.2902]
14. Papinski, K. (1990). Abundance and composition of rotifers in the Vistula river. Polish Archiv Hydrobiology, 37: 449-459.
15. Sa-Ardrit, P., Pholpunthin, P. and Segers, H. (2013). A checklist of the freshwater rotifer fauna of Thailand (Rotifera, Monogononta, Bdelloidea). Journal of Limnology, 72 (2): 361-375. [DOI:10.4081/jlimnol.2013.s2.e18]
16. Segers, H. (1996). The biogeography of littoral Lecane Rotifera. Hydrobiologia, 323: 169-197. [DOI:10.1007/BF00007845]
17. Segers, H. (2001). Zoogeography of the Southeast Asian Rotifera. Hydrobiologia, 446 / 447: 233-246. [DOI:10.1023/A:1017524011783]
18. Segers, H., Nwadiaro, C. S. and Dumont, H. J. (1993). Rotifera of some lakes in the floodplain of the river Niger (Imo State, Nigeria). II. Faunal composition and diversity. Hydrobiologia, 250: 63-71. [DOI:10.1007/BF00007495]
19. Sharma, B. K. (1983). The Indian species of the genus Brachionus (Eurotatoria: Monogononta: Brachionidae). Hydrobiologia, 104: 31-39. [DOI:10.1007/BF00045949]
20. Sharma, B. K. (1998). Freshwater Rotifers (Rotifera: Eurotatoria). Fauna of West Bengal: State Fauna Series, 3 (11): 341-461. Zoological Survey of India, Calcutta.
21. Sharma, B. K. (2014). Rotifers (Rotifera: Eurotatoria) from wetlands of Majuli - the largest river island, the Brahmaputra river basin of upper Assam, northeast India. Check List, 10 (2): 292-298. [DOI:10.15560/10.2.292]
22. Sharma, B. K., Noroh, N. and Sharma, S. (2017). Rotifers (Rotifera: Eurotatoria) from floodplain lakes of the Dibru Saikhowa Biosphere Reserve, upper Assam, northeast India: ecosystem diversity and biogeography. International Journal of Aquatic Biology, 5 (2): 79-94.
23. Sharma, B. K., Pou, K. R. S. and Sharma, S. (2016). Rich rotifer assemblage (Rotifera: Eurotatoria) of a sub-tropical wetland of Meghalaya, northeast India: ecosystem diversity and interesting features. International Journal of Aquatic Biology, 4 (3): 179-188.
24. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (1999). Freshwater Rotifers (Rotifera: Eurotatoria). Fauna of Meghalaya: State Fauna Series, 4 (9): 11-161. Zoological Survey of India, Calcutta.
25. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2000). Freshwater Rotifers (Rotifera: Eurotatoria). Fauna of Tripura: State Fauna Series, 7 (4): 163-224. Zoological Survey of India, Calcutta.
26. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2009). Biodiversity and distribution of freshwater rotifers (Rotifera, Eurotatoria) of Tamil Nadu. Records of the Zoological Survey of India, 109 (3): 41-60.
27. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2014a). Northeast India - An important region with a rich biodiversity of Rotifera, In: Sharma, B. K., Dumont, H. J. and Wallace, R. L. (Eds.), Rotifera XIII: Rotifer Biology - a Structural and Functional Approach. International Review of Hydrobiology, 99 (1-2): 20-37. [DOI:10.1002/iroh.201301701]
28. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2014b). Indian Lecanidae (Rotifera: Eurotatoria: Monogononta) and its distribution, In: Sharma, B. K., Dumont, H. J. and Wallace, R. L. (Eds.), Rotifera XIII: Rotifer Biology - a Structural and Functional Approach. International Review of Hydrobiology, 99 (1-2): 38-47. [DOI:10.1002/iroh.201301702]
29. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2014c). The diversity of Indian Brachionidae (Rotifera: Eurotatoria: Monogononta) and their distribution. Opuscula Zoologica Budapest, 45 (2): 165-180. [DOI:10.1002/iroh.201301702]
30. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2015). The diversity and distribution of Lepadellidae (Rotifera: Eurotatoria: Monogononta) of India. International Review of Hydrobiology, 100 (1): 34-42. [DOI:10.1002/iroh.201401739]
31. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2017). Rotifera: Eurotatoria (Rotifers), In: Kailash Chandra, Gopi, K. C., Rao, D. V., Valarmathi, K. and Alfred, J. R. B. (Eds.), Current status of freshwater faunal diversity in India. Zoological Survey of India, Kolkata. Chapter 7: pp. 93-113.
32. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2018a). The Indian species of Testudinella (Rotifera: Flosculariacea: Testudinellidae) and their distribution. International Journal of Aquatic Biology, 6 (1): 15-20.
33. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2018b). The rotifers (Rotifera: Eurotatoria) from the Kashmir Himalayan floodplains and Rotifera biodiversity of Jammu and Kashmir, north India. International Journal of Aquatic Biology, 6 (4): 208-220.
34. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2019a). The biodiverse rotifers (Rotifera: Eurotatoria) of Northeast India: faunal heterogeneity, biogeography, ecosystem diversity and interesting species assemblages. Bonn Zoological Bulletin, 68 (1): 147-162.
35. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2019b). The biodiverse rotifers (Rotifera: Eurotatoria) of the floodplain wetlands of Barak valley of Assam state, northeast India. Opuscula Zoologica Budapest, 50 (1): 3-15. [DOI:10.18348/opzool.2019.1.3]
36. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2019c). The biodiverse rotifers (Rotifera: Eurotatoria) from small wetlands of the Brahmaputra river floodplains of lower and upper Assam, northeast India. Journal of Limnology and Freshwater Fisheries Research, 5 (3): 187-196. [DOI:10.17216/limnofish.515981]
37. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2021a). Biodiversity of Indian Rotifers (Rotifera) with remarks on biogeography and richness in diverse ecosystems. Opuscula Zoologica, Budapest, 52 (1): 69-97. [DOI:10.18348/opzool.2021.1.69]
38. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2021b). The biodiverse Rotifera (Rotifera: Eurotatoria) of Assam, northeast India: biodiversity, biogeography and ecosystem diversity, In: Wanganeo, A. and Wanganeo, R. (Eds.), Biodiversity Conservation aspects and aquaculture. Book Enclave, Jodhpur, India. 2: 14-46.
39. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. (2021c). Zooplankton diversity of a sub-tropical small urban wetland of Meghalaya, northeast India with remarks on spatial variations. Journal of Limnology and Freshwater Fisheries Research, 7 (1): 213-228. [DOI:10.17216/limnofish.754060]
40. Sharma, B. K. and Sharma, S. and Hatimuria, M. K. (2015). Rotifer assemblages (Rotifera: Eurotatoria) of the floodplain lakes of Majuli River Island, the Brahmaputra river basin, northeast India. International Journal of Aquatic Biology, 3 (1): 1-13.
41. Sharma, S. and Sharma, B. K. (2008). Zooplankton diversity in floodplain lakes of Assam. Records of the Zoological Survey of India, Occasional Paper No. 290: 1-307+28 plates. Zoological Survey of India, Calcutta.
42. Vad, C. F., Péntek, A., Cozma, N. J., Földi, A., Tóth, A., Tóth, B., Böde, N. A., Móra, A., Ptacnik, R., Ács, E., Zsuga, K. and Horvátha, Z. (2017). Wartime scars or reservoirs of biodiversity? The value of bomb crater ponds in aquatic conservation. Biological Conservation, 209: 253-262. [DOI:10.1016/j.biocon.2017.02.025]

Add your comments about this article : Your username or Email:
CAPTCHA

Send email to the article author


Rights and permissions
Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

  | Journal of Animal Diversity

Designed & Developed by : Yektaweb